Wednesday, March 23, 2011

I don't agree with this


http://www.myfoxphilly.com/dpp/news/education/032111-peanut-allergy-case-hits-raw-nerve

A controversy over peanut allergies at a Florida elementary school hits home in the Fox 29 viewing area, as viewers have a field day with a touchy issue.
In Volusia County, Florida, Edgewater Elementary school is banning anything and everything with peanuts in it, to protect a student with a severe allergy.
That includes peanut butter, one of the main ingredients in the classic peanut butter and jelly sandwich and so many snacks and candies in so many kids' lunch boxes.
But even allergy experts are questioning whether the school went too far here.
Some parents at that school are convinced of it, so they picketed outside. But school officials are sticking to their plan.
They're requiring students to wash their hands every time they enter the classroom. The kids also have to rinse their mouths out, at the start of the day and after lunch.
And teachers have to make sure desks are getting wiped down constantly.
Our Facebook page had more than 100 comments on an issue that many parents take personally.
We also spoke with some viewers who thought the ban raised civil liberties questions.
"It's over the top, because once you ban peanuts from there, that's kind of reasonable," said Daniel john of Norristown. "But what else would you ban? Like, if someone's allergic to milk or cheese or anything else, are they going to make every student wash their mouth out then?"
"We're talking about a peanut allergy, something that's individual to that kid," said Ruth Henri of Vorhees, N.J. "I don't think it's something that's contagious. I mean if we were talking about some type of contagious disease, yeah I can see that. But, doesn't make any sense."
Cyndi Herbert of Media is more sympathetic.
"If it's a risk of a child's life, then i guess you have to comply. You got to think, put your own child in the situation, how would you want somebody to react to your child as well. Could be an inconvenience to some, but you gotta think of the child at the end of the day."
Mital Sheth says the school should be able to handle the issue.
"I have a friend who actually has a severe peanut allergy, and I grew up with him since 5th grade. And if he ate any peanut, throwing up all night, would have to go to the hospital, everything. And the entire school didn't have to do that, he just paid really close attention. And they just kept an extra eye open for him, in case he had a severe allergy at school."

My child dying from accidentally ingesting peanuts is my worst nightmare.

www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/20/katelyn-carlsons-family-s_n_838110.html?just_reloaded=1

On the last day before winter break at the selective Edison Regional Gifted Center school in Albany Park, 13-year-old Katelyn Carlson died after going into anaphylactic shock in school. The cause: Chinese food ordered as a celebration for her class.
Now, ABC reports, the Carlson family is suing the restaurant that provided the food, the Chinese Inn in Niles, for using peanuts in its preparation despite explicit requests not to.
According to the lawsuit, Chicago Public Schools officials were aware of Katelyn's acute allergy to peanuts. When teacher Jack Matsumoto ordered from Chinese Inn, he asked to be sure that no peanut products would be used in the food's preparation, the Chicago Tribune writes.
But lab testing on the food after the fact revealed that it did indeed conain trace amounts of peanut products, the Associated Press reported Saturday.
The wrongful death suit, which seeks an undisclosed amount above $100,000 in damages, was filed last Thursday in Cook County Circuit Court.